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to rename this ira the kay bailey hutchison spousal ira in her honor, and i hope, mr. president, we can join together and honor senator hutchison by getting that done before we close out our business this year. kay, of course, has always championed the state sales tax deduction, which may not seem like a big deal to others in this carriage carriages but it . but it is a big deal in texas. we don't have a state income tax. but we do pay a state sales tax. and of course kay has also worked to reduce the marriage penalty tax. she's been a strong defender of taxpayer interests and her efforts have made the tax code less hostile to saving and to families. she alluded to her great work with nasa. she's one of the senate's leading supporters of nasa and human space flight, and of course gnaws i nasa has contribd historic technological breakthroughs that have benefited all americans. kay appreciated the importance of basic scientific research to long-term american prosperity and she appreciates the role that nasa has played in fostering innovation. she's long said and advocated for support for nasa
greatly. they are senator kay bailey hutchison and senator scout brown. mr. president, in her marvelous book entitled "american heroines: the spirited women who shaped our country," senator kay bailey hutchison wrote the following: "no history can be written appropriately without acknowledging the part women have played in building the greatness of our country. end quote. as my valued colleague and good friend begins a new chapter in her life, i hope that she finds the time to add a new chapter to her own book, one that will be fascinating, inspiring, and auto biographical. like the women that kay celebrates, says an author from amelia earheart, from sally barton to condoleezza rice, kay bailey hutchison is a pioneer, a breaker of barriers. in the special election of 1993, the people of texas made her the first woman to represent them in the united states senate. in the three regular elections since then, they have confirmed their trust in her by ever increasing margins. as the leader of the senate commerce committee, kay has been a strong voice for transportation systems, better, effic
of the united states senate, i will present this pin to mrs. inouye in honor of her husband. our gift to her because he gave so many gifts to us. he was a lion in the senate, a real american hero. though gentle in style, he was a fierce warrior when it came to fighting for his nation or standing up for hawaii. when he received his medal of honor, he was rising to the call of the sirens at pearl harbor, volunteering to serve his country, putting aside his own dreams to be a physician. but he went on to be a healer of many wounds. he was decorated in world war ii for saving his fellow soldiers. my experience with senator inouye as a friend was that he was a devoted, dedicated public servant. he was hawaii's first representative of the nation's newest state. he was the first person of japanese heritage ever to be elected to the senate. imagine. he himself knew what it was like to break barriers and to break boundaries. when he came to the senate, he cherished his love for hawaii and its people. he fought tirelessly to improve their lives. now his style was one of absolute civility. he was the
. the presiding officer: the senator from mississippi. mr. cochran: mr. president, we wish to thank the distinguished manager of the bill for her courtesies and for her skill in managing this bill. her sensitivity to the need for improvements and sustaining the disaster assistance capabilities of our great country. thank you. mr. paul: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from kentucky. mr. paul: i ask unanimous consent to call up amendments 3376 and 3410 en bloc. the presiding officer: the clerk will report the amendments. the clerk: the senator from kentucky, mr. paul, proposes amendment numbered 3376 and 3410 en bloc. mr. paul: mr. president, when hurricane sandy struck, hundreds -- when hurricane sandy struck the northeast, hundreds of thousands, if not millions of people were without power. we all saw the video footage, we saw the terrible trauma and people are still trying to dig out from underneath the debris of hurricane sandy. during that period of time, hundreds of workers drove up from the south wanting to help. these workers were nonunionized and they were t
judge and i look forward to her nomination -- confirmation today. and with that, mr. president, i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? mr. cornyn: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from texas. mr. cornyn: mr. president, can you tell me how much time is remaining on this side? the presiding officer: 15 minutes. mr. cornyn: thank you. mr. president, it's become disturbingly clear that president obama doesn't mind whether or not we drive off the fiscal cliff. just last week, his own treasury secretary, secretary geithner, said the white house was -- quote -- "absolutely" prepared to go off the cliff unless republicans agree to raise marginal tax rates. in other words, during a period of high unemployment -- the highest since the great depression -- the president's willing to risk another recession in order to increase taxes on small businesses and the people we depend upon to create jobs. how much revenue will the president's tax hike generate? well, by raising the top two rates, it would produce only about $68 billion in 2013. i say "only," because in relationship to
. i thank her so much for working so well and hard on this. ms. stabenow: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from michigan. ms. stabenow: thank you very much. i first want to thank senator merkley who has been tireless in bringing forward the issues of the farmers and ranchers in oregon and to my colleagues who are here on the floor from new york and new jersey. i had the opportunity to be in new jersey with senator menendez and to see firsthand also with senator landrieu and senator tester, and it's very, very clear that this is a horrific situation and deserves our attention and support. what we are doing with this amendment, as modified -- i want to thank senator blunt for working with us in cosponsoring the amendment stk-rbs to basically -- is to basically take what we have done and passed in the farm bill and putting it into this very, very important disaster assistance bill. in the spring we experienced late freezes that wiped out many fruit crops in a number of states, including michigan, new york and pennsylvania. in my home state we had a 98% loss of cherry crop
them all and good for her. and she has of course appointed a new person mr. nides and i know that's you and you are really going to look at this. i am very very happy that you are going to leave this task force. but you know congress has its obligations too and we have to put our money where our mouth is and we are going to want to make sure that our diplomats are secure and we have to pony up the money. you know it's very easy and you hear rumblings in the conference -- congress about cutting back and lets cut let's cut foreign aid and let's cut foreign security. it's very easy to say that. we have pressing problems here, who cares about what happens overseas? i have heard people say that. that shouldn't he. we need to care and that is what we are doing. let me say this. according to the crs, congress has underfunded state department diplomatic security by $600 million under the request over the last three years. the house funding level was closer to three-quarters of a billion dollars below that. the aarp observe funding restrictions have led the state to be resource constrained rathe
." because she was in her doughnut hole. well, a couple weeks later, mrs. johnson would be back in the hospital. how wasteful is that? how -- why? why is that -- that costs a tremendous amount of money to our system. this is saving money. this is health care reform. this is medicare reform. it's improving people's health and saving money at the same time. so we have increased benefits, we've extended the life of medicare. that was done as part of health care reform. that is medicare reform. now, in the election, we had a discussion about this. there were a lot of ads about it. we know what governor romney would have done to medicare. he said very explicitly that -- and, again, the presiding officer has quoted this. he said very explicitly he would restore those billions and billions of dollars in overpayments to private insurance companies for no reason, for no good effect, just so that i guess these insurance companies could have more profit. instead, we reinvested this money into medicare. but he would have given it to the insurance companies. he would have replaced the health
? the presiding officer: the senator from maryland. mr. cardin: let me thank senator shaheen for her leadership on this issue. we've had many discussions about how to advance human rights issues and what is the best strategy to get the sergei magnitsky bill enacted into law. your leadership on the senate foreign relations committee on europe, your leadership in the helsinki commission, you've been one of the real champions on this issue. i just want to thank you, want to thank you for your good advice and for allowing us to be able to get us to this day. i'm convinced tomorrow the senate will pass this legislation. the president is going to sign it, and we will have achieved a great victory for human rights. i thank you. i think also your observations as we were talking about how to move forward with this bill in connection with pntr for russia and as senator lieberman talked about a little bit earlier, i am convinced as important as this bill was, that the magnitsky bill by itself would have been extremely difficult for us to get through for the president and for the president to sign and to b
: the leader. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the call of the quorum be terminated. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: mr. president, i rise today to honor a woman by the name of janice shelton. for her friendship, and 32 years of dedication as an employee of this body, the united states senate. 25 of those years janice worked as my executive assistant. she's demonstrated a sincere dedication to me, my office, my family, and this body, the united states senate. it's an understatement to say that she will be sorely missed. she will be. she's always been kind and thoughtful to me, to my wife landra, all my children, and to everyone that she comes in contact. if there's a problem, everyone knows, go to janice. no one has my ear the past 25 years like janice shelton has. she has been a professional career creating order where there could easily be chaos. over the course of her productive career with the army, the white house, and the senate, have been each -- each benefited from her unique expertise and professionalism and hard work. she began her professional life at the dep
of the economy and the united states obviously has work to do, my oldest daughter is doing her doctorate in math. there's a substantial contribution to national security in any case. with respect to the dr. jekyll and mr. hyde bit, economic growth is fundamental and innovation is the key engine for that and freedom is the foundation for that. i think we will see this play out in interesting ways globally including within china, and as we work to have a very open system economically and take advantage of technology, we also need to look at what needs to be done to deal with the threats of not just cyber but biotech and so on and look at doing that in partnership, and the partners we look at, and a substantial conversation about the rules of the road in cyberspace, we do that with many others, a fundamental issue. >> got a little bit from global security, the issue of the islands is primarily an issue of energy, and we are seeing it all over the world today, we don't have good mechanisms, maritime energy disputes, not only in the united states and eastern mediterranean, our pick is coming up. with
been grateful to have. especially in her darkest hours, men who lead by example and who expect nothing in return. mr. reid: mr. president, i -- the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: yes, i didn't mention -- i should have, but i'm really -- have been waiting the last hour or so to make sure that it was okay with his wife that i came here and said something, so i haven't had time to do much other than feel bad about senator inouye. as i indicated, i talked to irene. i wasn't able to talk to ken, but i did talk to irene. i want to make sure that everyone understands the depth of my feelings -- i'm speaking for the entire senate. he believed in me more than i believed in myself, many, many years ago, a couple decades ago, he said, you know, you're going to do great things in the senate, always talked about my leading the senate, and he always came and said,, oh, always -- you did the right thing by telling you that you did the right thing. the chapter of inouye in the senate is something that is remarkable. not only his military record but what he did with the defense aspec
know her term as close up as well as mr. cook because they have been incredible part rose to this agency. we jointly put in place definition rules as the congress asked us to do and we've jointly address public reporting of hedge funds. we were not asked by the congress or required to be joined but we have to harmonize where we can but it's different in timing to read these completed a lot 80%, and robert can tell you and mr. cook can tell you their percentage but it's partly because that's all we really do. we have received futures and swaps, and they have a lot more to oversee. >> we can allow him to characterize and we have a bunch more questions. >> i would agree there's been good coordination in terms of sharing documents. >> timing wise we are in a very different place. estimate 5% of the market i think the other thing is that the proposal stage there's been a lot of similarities. there have been some differences. sometimes the differences reflect differences in products and sometimes reflect a difference in approach and i think that is appropriate for people to thin
tennessee. mr. alexander: i speak as if in morning business. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. alexander: i want to thank the senator from california for her comments on the senate rules. i agree, this is something we should be able to talk among ourselves and work out. some of us who have been here a little while, watch the senate, know that it is a unique institution and fundamentally most of us are not very happy with the idea -- i think on bodge sidebothsides of the aisle not functioning as effectively as we really should. we need to get bills to the floor and then we need to have amendments. it's been historically the responsibility of the majority to decide what comes to the floor. and historically the minority, whom that happens twhomever thas the opportunity to have amendments. a couple of things have happened. the minority has blocked bills coming to the floor. that didn't happen. it happened 25 years ago. something else happened over the last 25 years. a procedure called filling the tree was invented by a republican -- by a republican majority leader. senator bob dol
. i join with the entire senate family in wishing her and john the very best in the years ahead. mr. president, in these closing days of the 112th congress, the senate is saying farewell to again one of our most popular and respected members, senator jeff bingaman of new mexico. when jeff came to this body 30 years ago, he had already led a life of accomplishment created in small-town new mexico, silver city. he was an eagle scout, graduated from harvard college, stanford law school, where he met his future wife, ann. while at stanford, he worked in senator robert f. kennedy's campaign for president. at the age of 35, he was elected new mexico attorney general in 1978. and four years later at the age of 39, elected to the united states senate. during his three decades in this body, jeff bingaman has been a classic workhorse senator as opposed to being a show horse senator. he is truly remarkable and distinctive among senators for his willingness to shun the limelight and share the credit in order to get important things done for his state and for this country. senator bingaman has b
. they wrote books. >> they are in many cases quite frankly more interesting as human beings than her husband. if only because they are not first and foremost limited by political ambition. >> dolly was both a socially adept and politically savvy. >> dolly madison loved every minute of it. mrs. munro hated it. absolutely hated it spent she warned her husband. you know, you can't rule without including what women want and what women have to contribute spent during the statement he was a little breathless and it was too much looking that i think goes a little too fast. a change of pace. >> yes, ma'am. >> probably the most tragic of all of our first ladies, they never should have married. >> she later wrote in her memoir that she said i, myself, never made any decision. i only decided what was important, and went to resend it to my husband. >> you stop and think about how much power that is. it's a lot of power. >> prior to the battle against cancer is to fight the fear that accompanies the disease. >> she transform the way we look at these bugaboos, and made a possible for countless people to s
and is testament to her strength and her spirit. the people of maine and america are grateful for her many years of service. i am grateful for her leadership and her friendship. and i know that olympia snowe will continue to influence national policy for many years to come. mr. president, we have a tradition in the senate of referring to our colleagues on the senate floor during debate as "my friend from this state" or "my friend from that state," and oftentimes the word "friend" really just means colleague. but there is a fellow senator whom i call friend in the truest sense of the word, and that person, mr. president, is the senior senator from connecticut, my dear friend, senator joe lieberman. when joe lieberman announced early last year that he would not seek reelection to the senate, he called himself a lucky guy for having had the opportunity to serve his state and his country. i would contend that it is we in this chamber and the people throughout connecticut and across our nation who are the ones who are truly fortunate, for joe lieberman's life long commitment to public service, includ
additional time to address this, and i'm happy to yield to him. mr. merkley: thank you, senator wyden. you mentioned anoringian sitting in coos bay, working on his or her lap stop, and calling up and saying the government can collect tangible material related to an investigation. does that mean that they can collect all of my web conversations knowing that the web circuits travel around the world multiple times, sometimes they pass through a foreign space. they ask this question because they are concerned about the fourth amendment and their privacy. how much ability do you have to give them a definitive answer on that? mr. wyden: absent the information that we are seeking to get under the amendment that i am going to offer, i don't think that it's possible for a senator to respond to your question. the issue for i think an individual senator would be do you know whether anyone has ever estimated how many u.s. phone calls and emails have been warrantlessly collected under the statute? do you know whether any wholly domestic calls and emails have been collected under this statute, which i b
of their end-user customers. idu thank you for your testament and look forward to hearing from her witnesses to i yield back. >> the gentlelady yield back. the gentlelady from california. the gentleman from connecticut is recognized for two minutes. >> thank you, mr. chairman but i like to take a few seconds. thank you, mr. chairman and direct working with but i like to take a few seconds to try to offset some of the criticism of you in which this hearing opened. of all the vast causes in the whether the difficult is that brought down the economy in 2008, no area i think is more complex than the areas that you've been charged to oversee, derivatives. not enemy, not for me, not activities of countrywide. this is one of the more catastrophic areas as will look back on when they were, and also probably the most complex area. and i salute you and couple that you are really working hard iran summit that is a normalcy challenging in the face of criticism but i exit the chairman of the committee when i say this. it is -- a sequence of the also forgets the devastation that was visited on this countr
further weaken them. ms mr. hanna has clearly stated, once gain the benefit are limited down because people who currently receive in benefits be cut, but as he stated in her testimony come you're going to go back to current employees and say hey, you need to pony up some more money that you may never get. so i think that's an issue and another issue is that the pbgc lines up in bankruptcy. i think this situation is clear that up to firm up the line line, and place it over there for decades are not at the front of the line. they could potentially beginning in much reduced benefit. doesn't mean that they will. i think a lot of those things are just questions, not particularly solutions, the things we have to work on them we don't have a lot of time to do it. the subcommittee is very active in coming up with legislation to help and i'm interested in knowing how much of the green has been improved by our accounting that we changed the assumptions because i think of .5%, even though i understand the historic assumptions have not occurred in the last 10, 12 plus years. i started this discu
with a more than $3 million positive balance. this progressive steps she took. i listened to her and i believe that's the kind of leadership that can help us continue down this path. >> senator hagan. >> thank you, mr. chairman. mr. secretary, thank you for your testimony today. i know that senator corker asked about reverse mortgages and i am concerned about that issue and i'm particularly concerned that $2.8 billion of the 16 billion economic shortfall are related to the program. can you talk more about why these classes on the reverse mortgage program? >> here's the fundamental problem without getting into too much of the history. at one point when fannie mae was issuing these phones, they were generally variable rate they allowed a borrower to basically draw on it over time the amount of money they need. as that program has switched to being a chimney may program, there is basically no option for those borrowers to do anything to try the full amount. >> why? >> because we don't have the statutory authority to be able to make the changes that would allow us to limit the draw up front. that
in the chamber wishing to vote or wishing to change his or her vote? if not, on this vote, the nays are 41, the nays are 54. under the previous order requiring 60 votes for the adoption of this amendment, the amendment is not agreed to. ms. mikulski: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from maryland. ms. mikulski: mr. president, i understand we will now be going to the reid substitute; is that correct? the presiding officer: that is correct. ms. mikulski: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that senator frank lautenberg be added as a cosponsor to the reid substitute. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. under the previous order there will now be two minutes of debate equally divided prior to a vote on substitute amendment 3395. who yields time? ms. mikulski: mr. president, our side yields back all time. the presiding officer: is all time yielded back? mr. cochran: mr. president, we yield back all time on this side. ms. mikulski: mr. president, i ask for a voice vote. the presiding officer: the question is on the substitute amendment. all in favor say aye.
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